Technology Student Association


TSA 2013-2014

Georgia Technology Student Association
Sponsor: Mr. R Pugh

Meetings: Every Wednesday @ 3:30 pm in room 505
Dues: $25

  President: Cameron N.
Vice President: Trevor S.

The Georgia Technology Student Association (TSA) is committed to providing students with opportunities to excel and advance. Georgia TSA is an organization for technology education students. Members are comprised of middle and high school students, alumni, educators, parents, and business leaders who are interested in learning how technology can best be implemented in discovering technological solutions for present, as well as future challenges. Georgia TSA promotes technology education as a means of preparing students for our dynamic world, inviting them to become critical thinkers, problem solvers, and technologically literate, leaders. The Georgia Technology Student Association strives to meet and exceed the expectations of its membership. Two diverse groups, chosen by their peers, make up our State Officer team and Advisory Council. These two groups are charged with planning, organizing, and participating in GA TSA yearly activities. The input they provide is vital to the growth and development of this organization.

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High School Competitive Events Overview

IMPORTANT! Below are brief descriptions of the activities detailed in the High School Technology Activities, The Official TSA Competitive Events Guide. Please be sure to also reference the Guide. These activities are great in the classroom for teaching about specific areas of technology, about problem solving, and about leadership. The Guide, which contains specifications and rules regarding each event, also serves as the official rulebook used at the National TSA conference.

Competitions developed for high school members of TSA include: High School Competitive Events Overview Agriculture and Biotechnology Design Click here for a video description of this event Participants (one team of two or more members per chapter) conduct research on a contemporary agriculture or biotechnology problem of their choosing, document their research, and create a display. The steps used in the solution of the problem may be student-performed research or a re-creation or simulation of research performed by the scientific community. If appropriate, a model or prototype of the solution may be included in the display.

Animatronics Participants (one team per chapter; one entry per team) will demonstrate knowledge of mechanical and control systems by designing, fabricating, and controlling an animatronics device that will communicate, entertain, inform, demonstrate and/or illustrate a topic, idea, subject or concept. Sound, lights and a surrounding environment must accompany the device.

Architectural Model Participants (one individual or team per chapter) develop a set of architectural plans and related materials for an annual architectural design challenge and construct an architectural model to accurately depict the design. In 2007, participants design a single family residential home for a family of four, following the principles and guidelines for affordable housing in America.

Career Comparisons Participants (one individual per chapter) thoroughly research various technology-related careers that are associated with one of the following technology areas: Biotechnology, Communications, Energy and Power, Engineering, Manufacturing, Medical Technology, Technology Education Teaching, Transportation, or Construction. After documenting the research, each student submits a cover letter and resume for the selected career and completes a formal job application. Finalists participate in an on-site mock interview.

Chapter Team (Written and Oral) Participants (one team of six members per chapter) take a written parliamentary procedures test in order to proceed to the finals. Finalist teams perform an opening ceremony, dispose of three items of business, and perform a closing ceremony within a specified time period.

Computer-Aided Design 2D, Architecture Participants (one individual per chapter) create representations, such as foundation and/or floor plans, and/or elevation drawings, and/or details of architectural ornamentation or cabinetry.

Computer-Aided Design 3D, Engineering Participants (one individual per chapter) create 3D computer model(s) of an engineering or machine object, such as a machine part, tool, device, or manufactured product. Students may be expected to extract a 2D representation from their 3D model.

Computer-Aided Design Animation, Architecture Participants (one individual per chapter) are given a hard copy sketch from which to develop an animated technical drawing using computer-aided design tools.

Computer-Aided Design Animation, Engineering Participants (one individual per chapter) are given a hard copy sketch from which to develop an animated technical drawing using computer-aided design tools.

Cyberspace Pursuit Participants (one team of three to five members per chapter) are required to design, create and launch a web site that features the school’s technology education program, the TSA chapter, and research about a cutting edge technological topic. Pre-conference finalists participate in an on-site interview. Click to access the High School Cyberspace Pursuit design brief.

Computer Aided Publishing or Desktop Publishing Participants (one individual per chapter) develop a notebook that includes a tri-fold pamphlet, a three-column newsletter, and a poster. All participants (not just finalists) then work to solve an on-site problem that demonstrates their abilities to use the computer to design, edit, and print materials for publication.

Dragster Design Participants (two individuals per chapter; one entry per individual) design, produce working drawings for, and build a CO2-powered dragster.

Electronic Game Design Participants (one team per chapter; a minimum of two individuals per team) develop an E-rated game that focuses on the subject of their choice.

Electronic Research and Experimentation Participants (one team of two or more students per chapter) research, plan, design, and construct an electronic device. Entries are evaluated on quality of research, ingenuity and complexity of the device, and effectiveness of the exhibit display.

Engineering Design/Problem Solving Participants (one team of three to five members per chapter) work as part of a team to solve a design problem. Through use of a model/prototype, display and design notebook, the team explains in detail how it has solved the problem and the solution�s impact on society and the environment. Finalists demonstrate the problem and solution in a timed presentation.

Extemporaneous Presentation Participants (one individual per chapter) give a three to five minute speech, fifteen minutes after having drawn a card on which a technology or TSA topic for a speech is written.

Film Click Participants (one team per chapter) develop a film that focuses on a subject of their choice from one or more of the following areas: the arts, social studies, science, or technology. Possible subjects include but are not limited to social study documentaries, nature films, advertisements, comedies, or dramas. Sound may accompany the film/video.

Flight Endurance Participants (two individuals per chapter) analyze flight principles with a rubber band-powered model aircraft.

Imaging Technology Participants (one individual per chapter) capture images and process photographic prints for display that depict the current year�s published theme. Finalists participate in an on-site event in which they record digital images and utilize multimedia software to prepare a storyboard/outline and media presentation of newsworthy TSA conference activities and events. The theme for 2007 is Through the Eyes of a Child.

Manufacturing Prototype Participants (one team per chapter) design and manufacture a prototype of a product and provide a description of how the product could be manufactured in a state-of-the-art American industry.

Medical Technology Participants (one team, with two or more members per chapter) conduct research on a contemporary medical technology problem of their choosing, document their research, and create a display. The steps used in the solution of the problem may be student-performed research or a re-creation or simulation of research performed by the scientific community. A model or prototype of the solution must be included in the display.

Prepared Presentation Participants (one individual per chapter) deliver an oral presentation that includes audio and/or visual enhancement based on the theme for the current year�s conference.

Promotional Graphics Participants (two individuals per chapter) develop and present a graphic design that can be used as a TSA recruitment tool and that includes the theme for the next year�s conference.

Radio Controlled Transportation Participants (one team of two members per chapter) design, fabricate, test, and demonstrate the use of a radio-controlled vehicle that collects and distributes a load during a five minute demonstration. Evaluation is based on performance, vehicle craftsmanship, and documentation of design efforts.

Scientific and Technical Visualization (SCIVIZ) Participants (one team per chapter) develop a visualization focusing on a subject or topic from one or more of the following areas: technology, engineering, science, mathematics, or social studies.

Structural Engineering Participants (one team of two members per chapter) work as part of a team, on site with supplied materials, to build a model of a structure that is destructively tested to determine design efficiency.

System Control Technology Participants (one team of three members per chapter) work as part of a team on site to develop a computer-controlled model-solution to a problem, typically one from an industrial setting. Teams analyze the problem, build a computer-controlled mechanical model, program the model, explain the program and mechanical features of the model-solution, and leave instructions for evaluators to operate the device.

Technical Research and Report Writing Participants (one individual per chapter) conduct research in an announced technological area and, using the knowledge and resources gained from this research, write a comprehensive report on one subtopic selected from two or three related subtopics designated on site.

Technical Sketching and Application Participants (two individuals per chapter) complete a written test in order to qualify as finalists. Finalists must demonstrate their ability to solve an on-site engineering graphic problem using standard drafting techniques.

Technology Bowl (Written and Oral) Participants (one team of three members per chapter) complete a written, objective test in order to qualify for oral question/response, head-to-head team competition.

Technology Challenge Participants (one team of two members per chapter) design, fabricate, and demonstrate the application and control of mechanical, fluid, and electrical power by sorting materials with a device that applies power and energy principles. Evaluation is based upon a timed demonstration of mechanical, fluid, and electrical energy principles, and craftsmanship.

Technology Problem Solving Participants (one team of two members per chapter) use problem solving skills and limited materials to develop a solution to a problem given on site.

Transportation Modeling Participants (one individual per chapter), using only certain materials and following required specifications, design and produce a CO2-powered scale model of a vehicle that fits the annual design problem and that takes appearance and performance into consideration.